Ask me anything  

Graphic designer and illustrator, working on paper/print and screen/digital. Based out of Newburyport. Senior creative designer at Boston Medical Center HealthNet plan since 7/28/14. Accepting freelance projects (off-site) and commissions. [http://kimminsdesign.com]



twitter.com/pkimmins:

    trendgraphy:

    Reissue of the NYCTA Graphic Standards Manual 

    Check the kickstarter video:

    "Dedicated to Massimo Vignelli, Bob Noorda, and the Unimark staff."

    Check the Kickstarter project here:  kickstarter.com/

    Check the manual online: thestandardsmanual.com/

    (via goodtypography)

    — 1 day ago with 1376 notes
    Tips on Using Huion Graphics Monitor GT-220 →

    tabletdealsblog:

    As we all know, Huion graphics monitor GT-220 was featured by the most advanced Huion digitizer technology which is designed for both beginners and professionals in the digital arts. I am deeply impressed by its HD resolution and a widescreen aspect ratio. Before it can be ordered, I had…

    (via huiontablet)

    — 3 days ago with 3 notes
    futuramb:

Digital Transformation and the Race Against Digital Darwinism
Brian Solis, briansolis.com


Digital Darwinism is a fate that threatens most organizations in almost every industry. Because of this, businesses not only have to compete for today but also for the unforeseeable future. Digital Darwinism is the phenomenon when technology and society evolve faster than an organization can adapt. There are many reasons for this of course. Every fabric of a company is strained due to internal and external influences. The challenge lies amongst the very leaders running the show today. Their mission and the processes and systems they support today may already be working against them.

This isn’t a technology problem, it is a leadership problem. The chiefs of our villages must realize that the situation is so different that they have to consult the medicine men in order to identify a new path, a new way of life.

    futuramb:

    Digital Transformation and the Race Against Digital Darwinism
    Brian Solis, briansolis.com

    Digital Darwinism is a fate that threatens most organizations in almost every industry. Because of this, businesses not only have to compete for today but also for the unforeseeable future. Digital Darwinism is the phenomenon when technology and society evolve faster than an organization can adapt. There are many reasons for this of course. Every fabric of a company is strained due to internal and external influences. The challenge lies amongst the very leaders running the show today. Their mission and the processes and systems they support today may already be working against them.
    This isn’t a technology problem, it is a leadership problem. The chiefs of our villages must realize that the situation is so different that they have to consult the medicine men in order to identify a new path, a new way of life.

    (via emergentfutures)

    — 5 days ago with 49 notes

    staff:

    Today’s the day. The day you help save the internet from being ruined.

    Ready? 

    Yes, you are, and we’re ready to help you.

    (Long story short: The FCC is about to make a critical decision as to whether or not internet service providers have to treat all traffic equally. If they choose wrong, then the internet where anyone can start a website for any reason at all, the internet that’s been so momentous, funny, weird, and surprising—that internet could cease to exist. Here’s your chance to preserve a beautiful thing.)

    — 1 week ago with 180420 notes
    Good evening Newburyport

    Good evening Newburyport

    — 1 week ago
    "Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one’s lifetime."
    Mark Twain, The Innocents Abroad (via liquidnight)

    (via actegratuit)

    — 1 week ago with 379 notes
    futurescope:

Enter the first cyborg-type robot - ISO Feature about Cyberdyne and the exoskeleton HAL

ISO, the International Organization for Standardization, has a neat feature about Cyberdyne, their exoskeleton HAL & ISO 13482, the first standard on safety requirements for personal care robots. Worth a read.


  What if cyborgs were real? Partly robot, partly man, functioning as one. No, we are not talking science fiction anymore. The first one is here and his name is HAL.
  
  Do you know someone in a wheelchair? What if I tell you there is a way that this person can walk again? That all it takes is a robot suit that reads your mind. What if you too could wear this exoskeleton to gain the strength of a Hulk or a Superman and help people? Would you believe me if I said all this was possible? Japanese robotics company CYBERDYNE has created one such exoskeleton, that is, a device designed to be worn by a human. This Hybrid Assistive Limb (HAL) can detect and reproduce the wearer’s intention to move by reading signals from the brain. According to CYBERDYNE’s CEO, Dr. Yoshiyuki Sankai, HAL is unique in that there is no other technology of its kind to compare with. “Our aim was to treat, improve, support and enhance human physical functions,” he tells me. Well, HAL does just that.


[read more] [Cyberdyne] [picture via wikimedia]

    futurescope:

    Enter the first cyborg-type robot - ISO Feature about Cyberdyne and the exoskeleton HAL

    ISO, the International Organization for Standardization, has a neat feature about Cyberdyne, their exoskeleton HAL & ISO 13482, the first standard on safety requirements for personal care robots. Worth a read.

    What if cyborgs were real? Partly robot, partly man, functioning as one. No, we are not talking science fiction anymore. The first one is here and his name is HAL.

    Do you know someone in a wheelchair? What if I tell you there is a way that this person can walk again? That all it takes is a robot suit that reads your mind. What if you too could wear this exoskeleton to gain the strength of a Hulk or a Superman and help people? Would you believe me if I said all this was possible? Japanese robotics company CYBERDYNE has created one such exoskeleton, that is, a device designed to be worn by a human. This Hybrid Assistive Limb (HAL) can detect and reproduce the wearer’s intention to move by reading signals from the brain. According to CYBERDYNE’s CEO, Dr. Yoshiyuki Sankai, HAL is unique in that there is no other technology of its kind to compare with. “Our aim was to treat, improve, support and enhance human physical functions,” he tells me. Well, HAL does just that.

    [read more] [Cyberdyne] [picture via wikimedia]

    — 1 week ago with 699 notes
    "You might think that the things that get people to change their behavior are things that are memorable, that they can use their analytical brain to set down a long-term trace, or even just emotional, but surprisingly what we see is the brain regions that seem to be involved in successful persuasion. We can predict who will use more sunscreen next week based on how their brain responds to an ad today. The brain regions that seem to be critical to that are brain regions involved in social thinking, in thinking about yourself and thinking about other people. So this seems to be more about our identity and the identities that we’re capable of trying on. If I can’t try on the identity that you’re suggesting to me—being a sunscreen-using person, or a nonsmoker, or something like that—the ad is much less likely to stick.

    […]

    William James said long ago that we have as many identities as people that we know, and probably more than that. We are different with different people. I’m different with my son than I am with you. We have these different identities that we try on, and they surround us… I’m really interested in looking at that as a mechanism of persuasion when it comes to regular old persuasion, when it comes to education, when it comes to public health, and when it comes to international issues as well. It’s finding that latitude of acceptance and finding out how to use it successfully."

    UCLA neuroscientist Matthew Lieberman, author of Social: Why Our Brains Are Wired to Connect, studies "latitudes of acceptance" to understand what makes us change our minds – something we’re notoriously reluctant to do.

    Also see Dan Pink on the psychology of persuasion.

    Lieberman’s full Edge conversation is well worth a read.

    (via explore-blog)

    (via emergentfutures)

    — 1 week ago with 366 notes
    tunein:


Expand Your Mind With These Awesome Science Podcasts
Remember how cool science class was? You could dissect a frog, solve for the velocity at which a plane is traveling, then learn about how vast the cosmos are. Learning amazing facts like this does not need to be a distant memory. Browse through our selection of our favorite science podcasts and start listening today! 
Read More

    tunein:

    Expand Your Mind With These Awesome Science Podcasts

    Remember how cool science class was? You could dissect a frog, solve for the velocity at which a plane is traveling, then learn about how vast the cosmos are. Learning amazing facts like this does not need to be a distant memory. Browse through our selection of our favorite science podcasts and start listening today! 

    Read More

    — 2 weeks ago with 8 notes
    Good morning from Newburyport.

    Good morning from Newburyport.

    — 2 weeks ago
    kimminsdesign:

Multiple personality disorder

    kimminsdesign:

    Multiple personality disorder

    — 2 weeks ago with 2 notes
    kimminsdesign:

Started out as an answer to the ‘Illustration Friday' challenge. Mostly a pencil sketch - finished in Photoshop. Anyone here had a chance to put Photoshop CS5 Extended through the paces?
Seems like some big improvements, especially on the painting end of things for illustrators…

    kimminsdesign:

    Started out as an answer to the ‘Illustration Friday' challenge. Mostly a pencil sketch - finished in Photoshop. Anyone here had a chance to put Photoshop CS5 Extended through the paces?

    Seems like some big improvements, especially on the painting end of things for illustrators…

    Enhanced by Zemanta
    — 2 weeks ago with 1 note
    kimminsdesign:

MFA life drawing; a few more gestures

    kimminsdesign:

    MFA life drawing; a few more gestures

    — 2 weeks ago with 1 note